Zipcar’s Short Sighted Definition of a Customer

UPDATE – 10/21/12

One day after including an @zipcar in a tweet about this post, I received a call from Veronica at my local Zipcar office.

She explained that, being in my local office, she had a bit more control over my account than the person I’d spoken to previously at the call center.

She offered to re-instate my account to honor the non-refundable year subscription I’d paid for, and also to set it to automatically expire, rather than roll over, on its anniversary.

I accepted her offer.  The romantic ride up the coast in a convertible may yet happen.


I just recently quit my subscription with Zipcar.

This was not because of a problem.  Prior to ending my relationship with them, I had no issues with their product.  In fact, I was kind of impressed.  I’d thought the sign up process was pretty slick and efficient.  I had used a car one time and found the experience simple and satisfactory.

But then my situation changed.  For various reasons, totally unrelated to the Zipcar experience, my wife and I decided it made sense for us to buy a second car.  With this car, I was no longer going to need a Zipcar.  And even though I’d committed to a year subscription only a few months before, I decided that, while I was thinking about it, I’d cancel my subscription so that I didn’t forget about it and have it automatically renew.

I assumed that I could cancel online.

Wrong!

I had to call a number and deal with a person whose job it was to convince me not to quit.  She was reasonable, and polite, and got efficient when I made it clear my decision was made.  But still, this didn’t feel very good.

I had assumed that even though I was canceling, as I’d paid for a year’s membership, I’d stay a member until the term ended.  I had visions of splurging on a sexy convertible for a drive up the coast with the wife or something.

Wrong!

My ability to rent a car was terminated as soon as I cancelled the subscription, even though I’d paid for a year already, and no refund was coming to me.  That didn’t feel good either.

I had assumed that as soon as I quit my subscription, I’d stop getting the annoying promotional emails from Zipcar that I’d never opted into in the first place.

Wrong!

None of these behaviors are entirely unreasonable, nor is any one of them particularly egregious.

However, they do tell a sad story.

The narrative arc of  this story is how a person, me, who had a really positive brand image of a company he thought was cool and innovative but from whom he no longer needed service is taught, as the door hits him on the way out, that said company has a sales-driven corporate culture that understands customers only as individuals from whom the company is currently making money.

My feelings were hurt, but I’ll get over it.

However, if I ever decide that I, or perhaps my soon to be driving teenage sons, need a car sharing subscription, I’ll look somewhere other than Zipcar.

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